Tag Archives: #remodel

The O.G. (Old Guest Room): Kate Spade-Inspired Painted Nightstands

You may have noticed that I did not post about the guest room project last week.  Or post about anything for that matter.  I took a break.  Do you do that?  When life seems to be too full, but you want to enjoy it instead of feeling stressed?  If not, do!  I’m back and feeling good.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Matching from @annumography blog

I’m joining the Inspired by Kate Spade Style Soiree today with these Shoreline Stripe-inspired nightstands.  But why am I telling you this on a post about my guest room?  Well let me tell ya.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Before from @annumography blog

We are repurposing our old master bedroom furniture in the guest room.  This is one of the nightstands.  As you can see, the top is not so pretty.  I had a small accident with a bottle of finger nail polish remover.  When it happened, I was bummed…a little…but more so for my hubby.  He really likes the shape and color of these nightstands and looked forward to keeping them.  The guest room is also his “dressing room” (doesn’t this sound better than just saying that the master bedroom closet is too small for us both), so I’m paying close attention to his style choices in the room re-do.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Sanding from @annumography blog

I thought maybe I could sand down the stain and refinish the top, but no luck.  That pesky finger nail polish!  So now what?  Paint.  Hubby is a big fan of all things beachy, so I thought a nautical-inspired paint treatment would be perfect.  I knew that I could use lots of color here, because so much of the design plan focuses on neutrals.

Kate Spade Shoreline

When I saw this Kate Spade Shoreline Stevie Bag, I fell in love with the colors and stripey pattern.  I decided to hack the pattern for my nightstands.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Taping from @annumography blog

This project was easy, because I relied on acrylic paints and painter’s tape.  (O.G. Sneak-Peek: see the unfinished closet in the background?)

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Painting from @annumography blog

Well, mostly easy.  Paint that is the exact color of the painter’s tape made it a little more challenging.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Striping from @annumography blog

I continued to add stripes, allowing each new color to dry completely before starting the next.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - After from @annumography blog

Here they are all painted up and ready to go.  Sorry for the grainy pictures.  I promise to have better ones when the room is staged and these lovelies are in their rightful place next to the bed.

Kate Spade-Inspired Nightstands - Matching from @annumography blog

I used two coats of matte finish polyurethane, though they look awfully shiny in this picture.  What do you think?  Do they look like the inspiration?  Most importantly, the hubby loves them.  Yay!

133/365 closet building still in progress #365project

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As I mentioned, the hit list for the O.G. hasn’t changed from the last time I shared it with you.  But we are making progress on the closet and the painting, though slow.  It’s all my fault.  I didn’t measure well when ordering the closet components.  But more about that another day.

  • Move everything back out of the room
  • Fix the plate for the light fixture/ceiling fan
  • Repair and sand the plaster on the ceiling and walls
  • Putty and sand the trim moldings
  • Paint the ceiling, trim and walls
  • Install the custom closet
  • Sand and stain the floors
  • Hang the ceiling fan
  • Hang the curtains and blinds
  • Move everything back into the room

Where is the half-strikeout button when you need it?

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The O.G. (Old Guest Room): Progress?

118/365 All day all about painting the closet. After pics tomorrow with the sunshine. #365project #seekarenfix

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What’s this sad and boring picture, you ask?  Oh, just our unpainted guest room closet.  It’s primed and (mostly) painted now.  But since I finished in the near-dark, I don’t have an “after” shot to show you yet.

Two weeks ago, I mentioned that we may not be crossing many items off the list as we get into the more time-consuming tasks of our guest bedroom project.  And then last week, I forgot to publish the list.  I guess it doesn’t matter, because it hasn’t changed much…as predicted.

  1. Move everything back out of the room
  2. Fix the plate for the light fixture/ceiling fan
  3. Repair and sand the plaster on the ceiling and walls
  4. Putty and sand the trim moldings
  5. Paint the ceiling, trim and walls
  6. Install the custom closet
  7. Sand and stain the floors
  8. Hang the ceiling fan
  9. Hang the curtains and blinds
  10. Move everything back into the room

What didn’t make the list:

  • Spending four hours at Home Depot while finding and ordering a new custom front door…and not because we are too choosy.  Did I mention that this is our second attempt at ordering after our second door measurement in two weeks?  (details to come in a future post)
  • More patching and sanding (which seemed like a never-ending job)
  • Hanging out with my nephews and niece (all work and no play make Karen a dull girl)
  • Installing a new service door on our detached garage (the hubby is beaming with pride)
  • And the usual weekend going’s ons

Whew!  I’m (almost) happy to be back at the 9-to-5 today.  Did you get a lot accomplished this weekend too?

The O.G. (Old Guest Room): Sanding Everything that Doesn’t Move

A lot of progress this weekend, just not much of it photogenic.

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The hubby celebrated the gorgeous weekend by staying indoors and sanding every surface in the guest room.  I went shopping stayed out of his way.  Sanding — though the biggest, most tedious job in our project — isn’t very photogenic.  I did manage to take this picture, while we did more shopping.  They are the future shelves and back to the armoire, which I will be refurbishing.  (In case you thought that I was shirking all tasks in this guest room project.)

OG Layout

 

I also spent some time in MS Excel mapping out the future room layout.  Have you ever used Excel for this?  I find it much simpler than some software tools meant for layout.

Resize Column

I just resize my rows and columns so that the cells are square.  I do this by selecting the columns I want to resize and then right-clicking to display the menu options.  I select Column Width from the menu window and then enter a number.  This part is guesswork, and I usually just play around with the width measurement until it looks the way I want it.  I then repeat the same steps for the rows to make the cells (grid) square.

Once I have my grid pattern in place, I define a single cell as one square foot.  I use borders to outline the dimensions of the room and closets.  I then insert the line shape to indicate doors and rectangles for the windows.  More inserts are used for the furniture.

OG Layout

Unfortunately, the headboard of the bed will partially block one of the windows.  In this room, it is unavoidable.  Directly across from the bed is the armoire that I mentioned before. It’s an old TV armoire from Pier One, and it is black with distressed red edges.  Not sure how that’s going to fit into the colors I had in mind for the room.  We shall see.

Under the other window is a small writing desk, and on the wall directly opposite will go one of my three sewing machines.  Yes, that’s right.  And ask me how much sewing I’m doing these days….

The closet is a fairly good size.  I bought some Martha Stewart modular closet pieces to make it more custom.  The other closet, labeled future bathroom, is a once-bathroom-now-turned-storage-closet-by-former-owners. Did you follow that?  We are looking forward to turning it back into a bathroom, especially since our home only has a single bathroom right now.  It will be wee, but we can be creative.  I’m dreaming of modern, streamlined European fixtures.    Dreaming.

Oh, and that big green thing in the corner.  I have no idea what will go there.  But I’m staying positive and calling it my opportunity to do something fun.  Aren’t guest bedrooms where you can decorate more for fun than practicality?

What would you do to fill up that big empty corner?

 

 

 

The O.G. (Old Guest Room): Prepping the Walls and Woodwork

Next up...sanding. We know how to have a good time around here. #seekarenfix

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After a long weekend of work, most of it completed by my husband, this is how every surface of the guest room looks.  (I provided lots of moral support, and then left to attend my little sister’s bridal shower.  Thanks honey!)  It is mudded, spackled, puttied, and ready for sanding.  Did you know that these were three different things?  I do…now.

The woodwork in this room is probably the worst in the house.  When we first purchased the home, we had dreams of fully restoring the Craftsman-influenced trim moldings to their former glory.  Unfortunately, the wood is in worse shape than we realized.  Not wanting to replace +100-year-old, solid walnut trim and doors, we have reached a compromise.  We are fully restoring the doors, but we will paint the trim.

I know, I know.  In a perfect world it would all be gleaming, stained woodwork.  But a perfect world it ain’t.  On some of the trim, there is more putty than wood.  Not exactly pretty when it’s stained.  The previous owner painted the base molding white in this room, and removing that paint may — based on previous experience — cause even more harm.  And having trim custom-milled to replace it?  Not in our budget and not reasonable for a home that we might like to sell for-profit in the next decade.

Do I sound a little defensive?  Sorry!  It’s just that I’ve defended explained our decision to folks so many times, it’s automatic.  We have painted the living room and foyer trim moldings so far and love it.  And we won’t be featured on This Old House any time soon.  Walk a mile in our shoes.  Moving on.

So speaking of previous owners, the picture above is the closet door.  The holes were left from a padlock hasp that was installed on the door.  Twice.  What on earth?

103/365 Hubby puttying. Maybe the #seekarenfix hashtag isn't quite accurate. #365project

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Hubby filled the holes.

The after shot, but not the after after shot.

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And then gave it some time to dry.  Because there is so much to be sanded in this room (seriously), we are going to do it all at once.  But that, my friends, is a job for another weekend.

Hoping this experiment saves the original trim piece #seekarenfix (all credit goes to the hubby)

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In the meantime, we are attempting to rebuild a large hunk of missing wood from the bedroom door frame with wood putty.  If I had to guess, I would say that it was damaged from another padlock-gone-bad.  Crossing our fingers and toes that this fix works like it does on the You-Tube video.

So let’s check out where we are on the list:

  1. Move everything back out of the room
  2. Fix the plate for the light fixture/ceiling fan
  3. Repair and sand the plaster on the ceiling and walls
  4. Putty and sand the trim moldings
  5. Paint the trim and walls
  6. Install the custom closet
  7. Sand and stain the floors
  8. Hang the ceiling fan
  9. Hang the curtains and blinds
  10. Move everything back into the room

Next weekend, we probably won’t have as many items crossed-off.  Sanding is a big job.  Picture us in haz-mat suits standing in the middle of a dust storm, and you would be close to envisioning the misery fun that awaits us.  At least we have a week between then and now to get motivated.  To quote the Beach Boys, “Help me, Rhonda!”

The O.G. (Old Guest Room): Making a List and Knocking It Out

the Get off our butts and Get the Guest room finished project is underway

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This post could be sub-titled the get off our butts and get the guest room finished project.

Do you have those rooms in your home that you intend to renovate/decorate/rejuvenate, but that end up becoming the room where all your out-of-sight-out-of-mind junk is “stored”?  We have (ahem) at least a couple of those rooms.  I blame a too-big house for a married couple with no kids except the two dogs in our case.  I’m like that.

Since Spring is (finally) here, I am more motivated to get back to some of our started-but-not-finished projects.  First up, the guest bedroom.  When renovated our master bedroom last Fall, the guest room took a beating.  It was already a bit of a dumping ground, so (maybe) you can imagine just how bad it was.  Too embarrassed to take a picture, let me describe instead  what filled the room: a queen-sized bed, a dresser, an armoire, a cocktail-table-turned-blanket-chest, two night stands, a wicker chair, a jewelry armoire, a sewing machine, a drop-leaf kitchen table and two stools, three shot guns, three lamps, assorted throw pillows, extra bedding, a vacuum, an old television, a DVD player still in the box, a desk, tools, paint, painting supplies, new curtains still in their packages, new curtain rods still in their boxes, old curtain rods leaning against the wall, clothes that need to be mended, and assorted “stuff” that sat on the surfaces of all of these items.  Did I mention that this 12’x14′ room was completely empty just eight months ago?

  1. Move everything back out of the room
  2. Fix the plate for the light fixture/ceiling fan
  3. Repair and sand the plaster on the ceiling and walls
  4. Putty and sand the trim moldings
  5. Paint the trim and walls
  6. Install the custom closet
  7. Sand and stain the floors
  8. Hang the ceiling fan
  9. Hang the curtains and blinds
  10. Move everything back into the room

There will be some fun projects along the way.  I mean, I can’t complete a room without painting some piece of furniture, can I?  But this our master list.

And speaking of knocking it out, we already completed part of #1 and all of #2.  (Sometimes we aren’t so good at doing things in order.  Excitement to get started = jumping into the middle of the list.)

97/365 Fixing this problem today. The joys of old home ownership. #365project #seekarenfix

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Let me get a little closer, so that you can see the problem.  The ceiling fan is not mounted flush with the ceiling, even though it should be.  We inherited this problem when we bought the house, but we hadn’t corrected it yet.

I think that's supposed to go in, not one, the ceiling

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And here is the reason why.  The mounting plate was installed on top of the plaster ceiling instead of being recessed.  Not hard to fix, but a little messy.  (And aren’t I the lucky one that dust photographs so well?)

might as well busted out some of the busted up plaster

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The hubby removed the fan.  There are some great online tutorials available with how-to instructions.  If you don’t have experience working with wiring, I recommend contacting a licensed electrician…especially in an older home like ours.

chiseling is a job for the hubby

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Next he removed the bracket and the mounting plate.  Before removing he plate, he traced a line around the outside, so that he had a guide for the amount of plaster that would need to be removed.  Using a chisel, he chipped away at the plaster being careful around the wiring.  (The power to this outlet was just off at the electrical box, but it is important to check and double-check before working.)

the "after" shot...sexy exciting, huh?

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After the plaster is removed, he simply screwed the mounting plate through the lathe boards and into the ceiling joists.  Here is the finished product.  It may not be the sexiest before-and-after project, but it will make a big impact in the room — both in looks and in safety.

As you can see from the list above, it will be a little while before I have after shots of the re-installed fixture.  Ahhh, the waiting!  In the meantime I will have to distract myself with moving the rest of the junk out of the room.  And dusting.